Welcome to TMI Publications - Publisher of Quality Canadian Books  TMI Publications is the publishing division of Turbotech Marketing Incorporated (TMI) a family owned business located in Gibsons on the Sunshine Coast, near Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. TMI was founded in 1983 by Primary Teacher Pamela Proctor and Professional Engineer John Roper. The company initiated its small independent publishing activity in 2000 to produce quality books in Western Canada that have high educational and historical value.
Pam and John being interviewed on the Gibsons Pier TMI’s first publication was I Was There: An Autobiography by Frank Proctor, an acclaimed B.C. artist and veteran of the D-Day Normandy landings, about his personal involvement in major events and social changes through the 20th century. His writing with humour and artistic perception has inspired many readers, both young and old. In 2007 TMI published Honouring the Child: Changing Ways of Teaching authored by Pamela Proctor. Pam writes about her life’s work in changing from traditional classrooms to personalize learning with child centred teaching and her experience with the founding and sustaining of a unique public school in Vancouver. She maintains her own website for her ongoing role as mentor to primary teachers and writing articles in support of changes to facilitate child centred personalized learning at www.honouringthechild.com  Following her book tours, in which she met with parents and teacher in 30 communities throughout British Columbia, Pam realized there was a need to know about the elements to organize and facilitate personalized learning for young children. To fulfill this need, she authored her second book Honouring the Child II: A Guide to Ways of Learning for Teachers and Parents which TMI published in 2013. For more about these valued books please view the Publications page. Single copies can be ordered through this website, but if your organization or group needs 3 or more copies please contact us for discounted pricing with free shipping.

Meet Artist Frank Proctor

After retirement as Quartermaster Sergeant in the Regina Rifles Regiment, and from his own business in Mission, B.C., Frank Proctor resumed his love of painting that had been nurtured during his youth in England. He went out painting at every opportunity well into his 90’s and completed some 350 works of art. His works were chosen twice for the British Columbia Festival of the arts, and for exhibitions at the Harrison Gallery and the Gibson Public Art Gallery. While Frank died in 2000, today his paintings continue to be enjoyed.  Recently TMI has started to produce a series of cards featuring some of his hallmark works. A catalogue of available cards and prints can be requested by contacting us.
 Frank and Ruth Proctor at the Harrison Gallery
Pam Proctor at the Gibsons Public Art Gallery

Latest News

Remembering the family man who answered the call Posted by: The Local Weekly November 6, 2019 in Breaking News, Local Community Leave a comment The Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery in Holland, where comrades of Frank Proctor are buried. Proctor’s daughter Pamela recently visited the cemetery with a member of the Gort family he had connected with at the end of the war. Frank Gort photo Eighty years ago, Frank Proctor, aged 37, had just volunteered for the Regina Rifles because he and his wife Anne felt it was the right thing to do. Hitler had invaded Poland, quickly overrunning that country, and Britain declared war on Sept. 3. Like everyone else, Frank and Anne had talked about the war and knew that Canada would ask its citizens to aid the countries resisting Hitler. In his book “I Was There”, Frank wrote that their relationship with their adopted country as well as the country of their birth (England) was strong. And if it must be that he go to serve his country, then Anne and his seven-month-old daughter Pamela (who now lives in Gibsons) would at least be secure while he was away. And so, on Sept. 9, 1939 he became Private Frank Proctor, serial number L22002, and reported to the regiment where he was soon chosen for training to become Quartermaster Sergeant. In July 1941 Frank was on the train to Halifax for embarkation on the Empress of Russia for England. (Before departing he was granted leave for the christening of his second child, Joanne.) During the journey he thought of home, his wife Anne and the two girls; “they were ever with me”. After three years of training in England, the final briefing for the Normandy landing was May 30, 1944. Frank led five heavy trucks loaded with guns, ammunition and spares through London to embarkation. The landing was delayed by bad weather, while they tossed about in the Channel. About leading his trucks onto Juno Beach he wrote: “Nothing imaginable could have been more savage”. Then the Reginas fought their way inland to Bretteville where they repulsed a determined German counter-attack. After a month-long battle for the city of Caen, the Reginas advanced along the French coast, liberating Calais.  By October they were battling with severe losses to secure the Scheldt estuary for passage to the Port of Antwerp. After advancing through Belgium into Holland, Frank was at a briefing for entering Germany when a cease fire was announced for 8am on May 5, 1945. He thought, “Thank God it is over”.  Managing supplies in a Utrecht schoolyard, Frank Proctor found a desperate food shortage and gave away food packages received from home. Doing this he met Bertus Gort and started a relationship with the Gort family now ongoing into the fourth generation. Leaving Holland, Frank was presented with a book which reads, “The Canadians who came overseas in the common crusade to fight against Nazi ideals fought some of the fiercest battles in Holland. They found victory in the Netherlands. They stayed as guests during the difficult period of re-establishment and learned to respect and admire the Netherlands way of life and they return to Canada to strengthen the ties between the two nations that the principles for which they fought may be strengthened”. Recently, Pamela visited Holland and Frank Gort accompanied her to Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery where she laid a white rose on each grave of 23 young comrades of her father. At the entrance of this beautiful, peaceful, immaculately-cared-for piece of Holland are inscribed the words “The land on which this cemetery stands is the gift of the Dutch people for the perpetual resting place of the sailors, soldiers and airmen who are honoured here”. by John Roper Published in The Local Weekly,   Encourage progress Posted August 21, 2019 in Letters To The Editor see full article - click here. This is for parents of young children. Following are a few ways you can support your child who may be beginning pre-school or primary school. Encourage free play, inside and outside, in the natural environment. and with natural and found materials. For water or sand play, provide shallow tubs, like a baby’s bath, for water and/or sand on a table and containers such as bottles, cups and cartons. Set aside table space with glue, paper, scissors and junk materials for creative activity and provide a box of dress-up clothes for dramatic play. Read to your child regularly. Learning to read is complex and interest can be greatly enhanced through the sharing of books and stories. Take trips to the library where your child may choose books and take part in programs. Play board games with your child, limit screen time to avoid obsession with video games, and pay attention to providing nutritious options for snacks and lunch. Become involved in school activities by visiting or volunteering and encouraging your child to acknowledge and respect differences.  In the past, children were taught basic skills in groups and many had difficulties. Now schools recognize that every child has different needs, interests, styles and rates of learning. Appreciate your child’s progress, whether fast or slow, and be encouraging – just as you were when she or he learned to walk and talk. Pam Proctor, Gibsons, Author of “Honouring the Child” This is just what people need right now” A Sunshine Coast primary class teacher
  • › Home   • › About Us   • › Publications   • › Links   • › Contact Us Copyright © 2019 TMI All rights reserved. Website developed by SCD




Ongoing this year is Pam’s dedication to the well-being of young children and she continues to be available to speak to parents and teachers, as well as writing supportively as circumstances arise. For her availability please contact us. 16th March 2018 At the Metrotown Hilton Hotel, Burnaby, B.C., Pamela provided her latest article, For the Health of our Children, to The Health Action Network Society In this new publication Pam describes the nine elements of creating a healthy leaning environment; style of setting, hands-on learning, choosing, play, activity, acknowledging interests, limiting screen time, healthy eating, time to learn. Well illustrated with her colourful action photos. View this article here. 31st March 2017 Pamela provided her article, What’s Old is New and What’s New is Old, to Co-ordinators of Primary and Early Learning Programs. Pam describes how in 1971, with like-minded colleagues, she started a program devoted to play based and personalized learning for children aged 4-9 in a new Vancouver public school, a program that continues to this day.
Photo and words by John Roper Click here  for more about “I Was There” by Frank Proctor
As published by “The Local”, a British Columbia Sunshine Coast community newspaper, on 6 th  June 2019 75 Years after D-Day, remembering Frank Proctor This week we are remembering the Juno Beach landings at Courseulles-sur-Mer where 359 young Canadians died on 6th June 1944. Pam Proctor of Gibsons stands near where her father Frank Proctor landed with the Regina Rifles to begin the liberation of France, Belgium and Holland from the Nazis. He was a man of strong Christian values and, after returning to his family after the war, Frank was always willing to talk to younger generations about why he volunteered to serve his country. He wrote about his experiences and the family agreed to publication of his inspiring words. Frank died at age 98 in 2000 and his autobiography “I Was There” is still available.
Welcome to TMI Publications - Publisher of Quality Canadian Books  TMI Publications is the publishing division of Turbotech Marketing Incorporated (TMI) a family owned business located in Gibsons on the Sunshine Coast, near Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. TMI was founded in 1983 by Primary Teacher Pamela Proctor and Professional Engineer John Roper. The company initiated its small independent publishing activity in 2000 to produce quality books in Western Canada that have high educational and historical value.
Pam and John being interviewed on the Gibsons Pier TMI’s first publication was I Was There: An Autobiography by Frank Proctor, an acclaimed B.C. artist and veteran of the D- Day Normandy landings, about his personal involvement in major events and social changes through the 20th century. His writing with humour and artistic perception has inspired many readers, both young and old. In 2007 TMI published Honouring the Child: Changing Ways of Teaching authored by Pamela Proctor. Pam writes about her life’s work in changing from traditional classrooms to personalize learning with child centred teaching and her experience with the founding and sustaining of a unique public school in Vancouver. She maintains her own website for her ongoing role as mentor to primary teachers and writing articles in support of changes to facilitate child centred personalized learning at www.honouringthechild.com  Following her book tours, in which she met with parents and teacher in 30 communities throughout British Columbia, Pam realized there was a need to know about the elements to organize and facilitate personalized learning for young children. To fulfill this need, she authored her second book Honouring the Child II: A Guide to Ways of Learning for Teachers and Parents which TMI published in 2013. For more about these valued books please view the Publications page. Single copies can be ordered through this website, but if your organization or group needs 3 or more copies please contact us for discounted pricing with free shipping.

Meet Artist Frank Proctor

After retirement as Quartermaster Sergeant in the Regina Rifles Regiment, and from his own business in Mission, B.C., Frank Proctor resumed his love of painting that had been nurtured during his youth in England. He went out painting at every opportunity well into his 90’s and completed some 350 works of art. His works were chosen twice for the British Columbia Festival of the arts, and for exhibitions at the Harrison Gallery and the Gibson Public Art Gallery. While Frank died in 2000, today his paintings continue to be enjoyed.  Recently TMI has started to produce a series of cards featuring some of his hallmark works. A catalogue of available cards and prints can be requested by contacting us.
 Frank and Ruth Proctor at the Harrison Gallery
Pam Proctor at the Gibsons Public Art Gallery

Latest News

Remembering the family man who answered the call Posted by: The Local Weekly November 6, 2019 in Breaking News, Local Community Leave a comment The Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery in Holland, where comrades of Frank Proctor are buried. Proctor’s daughter Pamela recently visited the cemetery with a member of the Gort family he had connected with at the end of the war. Frank Gort photo Eighty years ago, Frank Proctor, aged 37, had just volunteered for the Regina Rifles because he and his wife Anne felt it was the right thing to do. Hitler had invaded Poland, quickly overrunning that country, and Britain declared war on Sept. 3. Like everyone else, Frank and Anne had talked about the war and knew that Canada would ask its citizens to aid the countries resisting Hitler. In his book “I Was There”, Frank wrote that their relationship with their adopted country as well as the country of their birth (England) was strong. And if it must be that he go to serve his country, then Anne and his seven-month-old daughter Pamela (who now lives in Gibsons) would at least be secure while he was away. And so, on Sept. 9, 1939 he became Private Frank Proctor, serial number L22002, and reported to the regiment where he was soon chosen for training to become Quartermaster Sergeant. In July 1941 Frank was on the train to Halifax for embarkation on the Empress of Russia for England. (Before departing he was granted leave for the christening of his second child, Joanne.) During the journey he thought of home, his wife Anne and the two girls; “they were ever with me”. After three years of training in England, the final briefing for the Normandy landing was May 30, 1944. Frank led five heavy trucks loaded with guns, ammunition and spares through London to embarkation. The landing was delayed by bad weather, while they tossed about in the Channel. About leading his trucks onto Juno Beach he wrote: “Nothing imaginable could have been more savage”. Then the Reginas fought their way inland to Bretteville where they repulsed a determined German counter-attack. After a month-long battle for the city of Caen, the Reginas advanced along the French coast, liberating Calais.  By October they were battling with severe losses to secure the Scheldt estuary for passage to the Port of Antwerp. After advancing through Belgium into Holland, Frank was at a briefing for entering Germany when a cease fire was announced for 8am on May 5, 1945. He thought, “Thank God it is over”.  Managing supplies in a Utrecht schoolyard, Frank Proctor found a desperate food shortage and gave away food packages received from home. Doing this he met Bertus Gort and started a relationship with the Gort family now ongoing into the fourth generation. Leaving Holland, Frank was presented with a book which reads, “The Canadians who came overseas in the common crusade to fight against Nazi ideals fought some of the fiercest battles in Holland. They found victory in the Netherlands. They stayed as guests during the difficult period of re- establishment and learned to respect and admire the Netherlands way of life and they return to Canada to strengthen the ties between the two nations that the principles for which they fought may be strengthened”. Recently, Pamela visited Holland and Frank Gort accompanied her to Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery where she laid a white rose on each grave of 23 young comrades of her father. At the entrance of this beautiful, peaceful, immaculately-cared-for piece of Holland are inscribed the words “The land on which this cemetery stands is the gift of the Dutch people for the perpetual resting place of the sailors, soldiers and airmen who are honoured here”. by John Roper Published in The Local Weekly,   Encourage progress Posted August 21, 2019 in Letters To The Editor see full article - click here. This is for parents of young children. Following are a few ways you can support your child who may be beginning pre-school or primary school. Encourage free play, inside and outside, in the natural environment. and with natural and found materials. For water or sand play, provide shallow tubs, like a baby’s bath, for water and/or sand on a table and containers such as bottles, cups and cartons. Set aside table space with glue, paper, scissors and junk materials for creative activity and provide a box of dress-up clothes for dramatic play. Read to your child regularly. Learning to read is complex and interest can be greatly enhanced through the sharing of books and stories. Take trips to the library where your child may choose books and take part in programs. Play board games with your child, limit screen time to avoid obsession with video games, and pay attention to providing nutritious options for snacks and lunch. Become involved in school activities by visiting or volunteering and encouraging your child to acknowledge and respect differences.  In the past, children were taught basic skills in groups and many had difficulties. Now schools recognize that every child has different needs, interests, styles and rates of learning. Appreciate your child’s progress, whether fast or slow, and be encouraging – just as you were when she or he learned to walk and talk. Pam Proctor, Gibsons, Author of “Honouring the Child” This is just what people need right now” A Sunshine Coast primary class teacher
  • › Home   • › About Us   • › Publications   • › Links   • › Contact Us Copyright © 2019 TMI All rights reserved. Website developed by SCD




Ongoing this year is Pam’s dedication to the well-being of young children and she continues to be available to speak to parents and teachers, as well as writing supportively as circumstances arise. For her availability please contact us. 16th March 2018 At the Metrotown Hilton Hotel, Burnaby, B.C., Pamela provided her latest article, For the Health of our Children, to The Health Action Network Society In this new publication Pam describes the nine elements of creating a healthy leaning environment; style of setting, hands-on learning, choosing, play, activity, acknowledging interests, limiting screen time, healthy eating, time to learn. Well illustrated with her colourful action photos. View this article here. 31st March 2017 Pamela provided her article, What’s Old is New and What’s New is Old, to Co-ordinators of Primary and Early Learning Programs. Pam describes how in 1971, with like-minded colleagues, she started a program devoted to play based and personalized learning for children aged 4-9 in a new Vancouver public school, a program that continues to this day. She writes about how she made major changes in her approach to teaching and how she shared her experiences by speaking, mentoring and writing. She applies the wisdom of early educators to the new curriculum, as reflected by the testimony of a former student, “the thing I’m most grateful for is instilling experiential learning in me at a very early age. View this article here.
As published by “The Local”, a British Columbia Sunshine Coast community newspaper, on 6th June 2019  75 Years after D-Day, remembering Frank Proctor This week we are remembering the Juno Beach landings at Courseulles-sur-Mer where 359 young Canadians died on 6th June 1944.  Pam Proctor of Gibsons stands near where her father Frank Proctor landed with the Regina Rifles to begin the liberation of France, Belgium and Holland from the Nazis.  He was a man of strong Christian values and, after returning to his family after the war, Frank was always willing to talk to younger generations about why he volunteered to serve his country. He wrote about his experiences and the family agreed to publication of his inspiring words. Frank died at age 98 in 2000 and his autobiography “I Was There” is still available.
Photo and words by John Roper Click here for more about “I Was There” by Frank Proctor